[RUSSO-JAPANESE WAR] – NESSLER, V. and M. SOLOVIEV.

Три плакаты: Боевая песенка Донцов, Казак Петруха, Атака на Порт Монэ.

£1,750

Три плакаты: Боевая песенка Донцов, Казак Петруха, Атака на Порт Монэ.
[Battle Song of the Don Cossacks; Cossack Petrukha; Attack on Port Mone].
Russ. Tovarish., Moskva, and Nessler, Skt. Peterburg, [Jan.-June] 1904.

Три плакаты: Боевая песенка Донцов, Казак Петруха, Атака на Порт Монэ.

Description

Russian satirical prints from the early stages of the war, in fine condition.

Attack on Port Mone illustrates the content of the satirical limerick written at the bottom of the print. In this brief but punchy rhyme, the author satirises the Japanese who are struggling to win American financial support, here as Uncle Sam, during the war against Russia. “Port Mone” stands here as an clever pun on “porte-monnaie” (ie. wallet, in French and Russian) and Port-Arthur, the most important site of conflict throughout the war, known also in Chinese as Lushun port. Attack on Port Mone, though it incorrectly describes the Japanese as the losing side, is ominously prescient of the United States’ involvement in the events which will conclude the conflict. The war will end in 1905 with great losses for Russia and a peace deal brokered in New Hampshire by the President of the United States.

Similarly, Cossack Petrukha and Battle Song of the Don Cossacks satirise the Japanese efforts against the Russians during the war. The first, set against the background of Port Arthur, illustrates the verses written on the lower portion of the plate, where the popular poet Vladimir Gilyarovsky compares the Japanese soldiers to impertinent lap dogs that must be punished. Cossack Petrukha also refers to the prowess of the Russian forces, who are set to defeat the Japanese enemy just as the Russian cossack has defeated other foreign enemies in the past.

The posters, drawn in the lubok style, testify to the Russian war efforts, which were not limited to the battlefield but relied heavily on the talents of Russian artists and literary figures as well.

Description

Three coloured posters, the smallest 55.5 x 38 cm, the largest 61 x 40 cm. Posters printed on thin paper, with titles; some minor fraying at the edges, only marginal.

Bibliography

 

Stock ID: 86412